PSDF Conference

PSDF is pleased to announce its first ever Conference on ‘Capturing skilled jobs for Pakistanis in Gulf countries’. The Conference will be in Lahore, Pakistan on Thursday October 18, 2018. It is expected to be attended by senior members of various international and multilateral organisations, employers from the Gulf and national decision makers from the skills policy space.


DATE
October 18, 2018
VENUE
Crystal Hall B, Pearl Continental Hotel, Lahore
TIMINGS
9:00 to 16:30

PROGRAM

PSDF has conducted a comprehensive study on the opportunities and challenges faced by Pakistani labour in accessing skills-based employment opportunities in the Gulf countries. Pakistanis have been historically going to the Gulf countries for work and remittances from the Gulf countries constitute about 60% of the total remittances. Based on the key findings of the Report on the changing employment landscape in the Gulf and steps Pakistan needs to take to guard its employment market share and remittances, the Conference has been organized to debate and make recommendations on the following key topics:


1

TOPIC I

FUTURE OF SKILLS IN THE ERA OF 4TH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

The 4th Industrial Revolution is upon us. It is more pervasive in the industrialized world, but the emerging markets are not insulated from its devastating effects. Automation is now a cross-cutting trend across manufacturing and services sectors. It brings efficiency, scale, speed and improved productivity that cannot be matched by manual labour. Connected with global value chains, automation is the new normal to stay competitive. Other elements of the industrial revolution; machine learning, augmented reality, additive printing etc. are to follow soon. The impact of these seismic changes will radically alter the future of work and the skills needed to do that work. What does this mean for millions of unskilled youth in emerging markets and their employment prospects? What social and political implications will this have on Governments and what is being done to embrace change?

MODERATOR:

blankMohammed Ali Khan

Senior Education Specialist, International Finance Corporation

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PANELISTS:

DirkDirk Schmautzer

Partner and Co-Head of Global Education Practice, McKinsey & Company

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Patric Morton_headshotPatrick Morton

Deputy COO – Generation You Employed

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Fahad Iqbal PictureFahad Iqbal

Managing Director, Ravi Automobile Pvt. Ltd

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blankQasif Shahid

Co-founder and CEO Finja

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1

TOPIC II

EMPLOYMENT SPACE FOR SKILLED IN THE GULF: IDENTIFYING OPPORTUNITIES & EMPLOYER NEEDS

Over 60% of Pakistan’s foreign remittances come from the Gulf countries, primarily KSA and the UAE. Most of the Pakistani workers going to the Gulf go on general labour visa and are unskilled. The employment landscape in the Gulf is also changing with slow growth in traditional sectors like Oil & Gas and Construction due to rationalization of oil prices. The new growth sectors, especially Services, Aviation and Facilities Management, require skilled workers. Additionally, localisation regulations are being adopted by the Governments to support the employment of nationals. Employers also have long standing and tested recruitment channels that are hard for them to give up. Who are the players within the TVET sector that need to play a leading role in capturing opportunities for skilled Pakistani labour in the Gulf? How will they understand the employer needs and create incentive structures that will entice employers to hire from Pakistan? Do employers care about local or international certifications when making hiring decisions?

MODERATOR:

DirkDirk Schmautzer

Partner and Co-Head of Global Education Practice, McKinsey & Company

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PANELISTS:

Ahmed JalalAhmad Jalal

CEO, Aman Foundation

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Fatima Asad Said

Regional Director, AbacusConsulting

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Ahsan Qureshi

Chief HR Officer, Descon Engineering Limited

 

 

 

ahmad shafiqAhmad Shafiq

CEO, COTHM

 

 

 


1

TOPIC III

WHAT FACTORS LEAD TO JOB-READINESS?

There is a lot of work happening within the skills space on upgrading technical skills of the youth. However, the industry strongly believes that it is not enough to ensure job-readiness. Imparting soft skills, that includes mindsets, behaviours and professional skills are just as, if not more, important than technical skills. Many employers are of the view that TVET organisations must focus more on the behavioural and professional skills as technical skills can be taught by the industry better. Yet, most TVET institutes continue to focus, solely or primarily, on technical skills with a ‘light touch’ of soft skills at the end. What is the importance of soft skills in future work? What is the best methodology to integrate them with technical skills building? Are they standard across trades or vary from one job role to another? Is it too late to teach soft skills to grown-up youth?

MODERATOR:

blankZahra Khan

Global Head of Partnership – Generation You Employed

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PANELISTS:

blankFaisal Siddiqui

CEO – Daewoo Express Pakistan

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Moeed Yousaf - MUSEMoeed Yousaf

Founder and Managing Director – MUSE Pvt. Ltd.

 

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Shahid Mustafa pic

Shahid Mustafa

CEO – Telenor Microfinance Bank

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blankFaham Ahmad

HR Director, Asia Pacific Region, Pepsi Co. Int.

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1

TOPIC IV

OVERSEAS EMPLOYMENT PROMOTERS (OEPS): WHAT ROLE SHOULD THEY PLAY?

Overseas Employment Promoters are the critical bridge that bring together employers looking for skilled talent and workers seeking jobs overseas. Typically, large to medium sized employers appoint OEPs in different countries that are responsible for managing the entire recruitment process for them. Different regulations govern the commercial interest of OEPs in different countries. Many do not allow them to charge the job seeker: they need to be compensated by the employer. In others, including Pakistan, the space is unregulated and OEPs charge exploitative amounts from job seekers, pushing them into debt for a substantial period of their overseas employment. The industry average of recruitment success rate of employers through OEPs ranges between 10 to 30%. What is the ideal role OEPs should be playing in supporting overseas employment? Should OEP activity be regulated in terms of commercial benefit and protecting the job seekers from exploitative practices? Should the Government intervene and help job seekers with emigration costs?

MODERATOR:

Fatima Afzal picFatimah Afzal

Private Sector Development Advisor, DFID (UK AID)

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PANELISTS:
blankKashif Noor

DG, Bureau of Emigration & Overseas Employment

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blankAbdul Khalique Khan

CEO, Mansol Manpower Solutions

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Issam Baig picIssam Baig

CEO, JMS Manpower

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blankMurtaza Ali

General Manager, Descon

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1

WHAT NEEDS TO CHANGE?

ROLE OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE COLLABORATION IN IMPROVING LABOUR EXPORT

Remittances from the Gulf constitute 60% of total foreign remittances (USD 19B in 2017). Pakistan’s labour exports to the Gulf have significantly declined in the last two years; sharpest decline has been witnessed in Saudi Arabia. The decline can be attributed, in part, to the economic slowdown in the Gulf and creation of fewer job opportunities. The employment landscape is also gravitating towards more skilled and efficient workforce. The overseas employment value chain needs to be reconstructed with focus of understanding skills needs of employers in the Gulf, grasp of and alignment with Gulf skills occupational standards, better prescreening, training on technical and soft skills, financial support for emigration costs and employer relationships, either directly or through quality-conscious OEPs. Most importantly, quotas for Pakistani labour are also getting squeezed and other countries are increasing their market share. What roles do the Government and the private sector need to play to increase the export of skilled manpower? Is there a need to change existing laws, draft new ones and/or focus on enforcement? Which Government organisations need to do what and are they ready?
 

MODERATOR:

blankDr. Ali Cheema

Associate Professor of Economics and Political Science, LUMS

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PANELISTS:

DirkMakhdum Hashim Jawan Bakht

Minister for Finance, Punjab

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Patric Morton_headshotTaimur Saleem Khan Jhagra

Minister for Finance, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

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Fahad Iqbal PictureMohammed Ali Khan

Senior Education Specialist, International Finance Corporation

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Fahad Iqbal PictureDirk Schmautzer

Partner and Co-Head of Global Education Practice, McKinsey & Company

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Fahad Iqbal PictureZahra Khan

Global Head of Partnership – Generation You Employed

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Fahad Iqbal PictureFatimah Afzal

Private Sector Development Advisor, DFID (UK AID)

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Fahad Iqbal PictureJawad Khan

CEO, Punjab Skills Development Fund

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DOWNLOADS
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE CONFERENCE AGENDA

 

 

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE TOPIC OF DISCUSSION

Click here to view the Gulf Report

 


CONTACT US
PSDF Communications: communications@psdf.org.pk